H1N1 still out there

I haven’t heard much about the H1N1 virus lately, so I decided to check the CDC and WHO websites to see what was going on.  The above may is from the CDC and shows domestic cases.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (or CDC) has this to say about cases in the US:

U.S. Human Cases of H1N1 Flu Infection (As of May 15, 2009, 11:00 AM ET)  Â

States*Confirmed and Probable
Cases
Deaths
Alabama
55 cases
0 deaths
Arkansas
2 cases
0 deaths
Arizona
435 cases
1 death
California
504 cases
0 deaths
Colorado
55 cases
0 deaths
Connecticut
47 cases
0 deaths
Delaware
60 cases
0 deaths
Florida
68 cases
0 deaths
Georgia
18 cases
0 deaths
Hawaii
10 cases
0 deaths
Idaho
5 cases
0 deaths
Illinois
638 cases
0 deaths
Indiana
71 cases
0 deaths
Iowa
66 cases
0 deaths
Kansas
30 cases
0 deaths
Kentucky**
13 cases
0 deaths
Louisiana
57 cases
0 deaths
Maine
14 cases
0 deaths
Maryland
28 cases
0 deaths
Massachusetts
135 cases
0 deaths
Michigan
142 cases
0 deaths
Minnesota
36 cases
0 deaths
Missouri
19 cases
0 deaths
Montana
4 cases
0 deaths
Nebraska
27 cases
0 deaths
Nevada
26 cases
0 deaths
New Hampshire
18 cases
0 deaths
New Jersey
14 cases
0 deaths
New Mexico
68 cases
0 deaths
New York
242 cases
0 deaths
North Carolina
12 cases
0 deaths
North Dakota
2 cases
0 deaths
Ohio
14 cases
0 deaths
Oklahoma
26 cases
0 deaths
Oregon
94 cases
0 deaths
Pennsylvania
47 cases
0 deaths
Rhode Island
8 cases
0 deaths
South Carolina
36 cases
0 deaths
South Dakota
4 cases
0 deaths
Tennessee
74 cases
0 deaths
Texas
506 cases
2 deaths
Utah
91 cases
0 deaths
Vermont
1 cases
0 deaths
Virginia
21 cases
0 deaths
Washington
246 cases
1 death
Washington, D.C.
12 cases
0 deaths
Wisconsin
613 cases
0 deaths
TOTAL*(47)
4,714 cases
4 deaths

*includes the District of Columbia

**one case is resident of KY but currently hospitalized in GA.

This table will be updated daily Monday-Friday at around 11 AM ET.

NOTE: Because of daily reporting deadlines, the state totals reported by CDC may not always be consistent with those reported by state health departments. If there is a discrepancy between these two counts, data from the state health departments should be used as the most accurate number.

Pretty much sums it up for the US. What about the world? Turning to the World Health Organization’s (or WHO) website, I found the following map:

The US has almost doubled Mexico’s (where this all began) cases.  Currently the US has 4,714 while Mexico has 2,895 cases with 4 and 66 deaths respectively.

It’s been reported that the real concern will be this fall and winter when the virus can turn more deadly and resistant to anti-virals.  Let’s hope not.

 

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